Monday, July 16, 2018

Exercise and PTSD/Trauma


Focusing on your body and how it feels when you exercise, can help your nervous system become “unstuck.” Outdoor activities like hiking, sailing and rock climbing have shown to reduce symptoms of PTSD (Post Traumatric Stress Syndrome)
Other mental and emotional benefits of exercise:
  • ·        Sharper memory and thinking
  • ·        Higher self-esteem
  • ·        Better sleep
  • ·        More energy
  • ·        Stronger resilience



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Monday, July 9, 2018

Plan Your Day!

1. Make it realistic. Don’t work on impulse, and do more than you can handle.
2. Prioritize your work.
3. Know your distractions and take steps to control them (i.e., turn off your phone)
4. Start early, and keep on going.
5. Don’t waste your time on  pointless things
6. Switch between focused work and short breaks.
7. Be flexible  with obstacles.

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Monday, July 2, 2018

An Unexpected Turn of Events

I believe that the Universe is ALWAYS speaking to us. What we HAVE to do is pay attention. Events and situations are always speaking to us. Are we listening?

This happened to me recently. I had to have a routine colonoscopy as part of my wellness program. By nature, I’m not a procrastinator. In this case, I put it off  till the last minute. The reason? I had to have someone drive me to, and from,  the hospital. The procedure involves sedation. The hospital is FIRM on having someone be with you for the procedure.

Since I couldn’t get anyone to take me, I used the delivery service through my insurance plan. I was relieved that I had this option. I was also anxious as to how this would all play out. I tend  to control things and wanted this to be seamless.

The day arrived and my driver arrived on schedule. Things were going well until I mentioned that he’d have to walk me into the hospital and stay with me for fifteen minutes. This was the hospital policy. He refused. In his words, “I just drop people off and leave.” I was firm in that I couldn’t go through the procedure unless he respected  my wishes.

He walked me to my destination, albeit begrudgingly. His behavior alerted the hospital staff to contact the insurance company about how this would ALL play out.

In this moment, I witnessed a calamity of errors that pushed my anxiety button.
Things settled down and I was led to a pre-exam room. The blood pressure cup was attached and I lay there until it was time for the procedure. The nurses were concerned about my blood pressure. It’s usually high when I see the doctor. This time, it was off  the charts. Unbeknownst to me, the doctor cancelled that procedure and contacted the  E.R. staff. He believed that I was about to have a heart attack or stroke. The nurses came in to inform me about the procedure. I HAD to go to the ER to have the blood pressure addressed.

I was in the E.R. for a couple of hours to assess my blood pressure  and heart. Everything checked out and I was discharged.

Needless to say, I didn’t sleep well that night. I was so frustrated with the turn of events. I replayed the situation over and over again.

It took me a couple of days before reality hit. I was trying to control the situation. By nature, I’m a control freak. This was no exception. ALL the events were showing me something – I needed to slow down and stop controlling situations. If I continued to control events, the anxiety would get worse. Now, when I feel I want to control things, I remember what happened in the E.R. IN addition, I practice “breathing into my heart” and remembering that I am on a journey. Things WILL work out positively if I relinquish control!

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Focus: Anxiety, Flow with Life, Universe, Life lessons, Spirit 


Question for you: 1) What situations do you still want to control? Why? 2) What can you do to change this behavior?

Monday, June 25, 2018

Exercise and ADHD


Regular exercise is one of the easiest ways to reduce the symptoms of ADHD. It also improves concentration, motivation, memory and mood. Physical activity boosts the brain’s dopamine and serotonin levels. Exercise works in the same way that ADHD medications such as Ritalin and Adderall.


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Monday, June 18, 2018

Exercise and Stress


Have you ever noticed how your body feels when you’re under stress? Your muscles may be tense, especially in your neck and face. You may also feel a tightness in your chest. You might also have problems like insomnia and heartburn. The worry and discomfort of all these physical symptoms can in turn lead to even more stress.

Exercising is an effective way to break this cycle. Physical activity helps to relax the muscles and relieve tension in the body. The body and mind are closely linked. When your body feels better, so will your mind.


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Monday, June 11, 2018

Exercise and Anxiety

Exercise is also a natural and effective anti-anxiety treatment. It relieves tension and stress, boosts physical and mental energy, and enhances well-being through the release of endorphins. Anything that gets you moving can help, but you’ll get a bigger benefit if you pay attention, instead of zoning out.

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Monday, June 4, 2018

Exercise and Depression


Exercise can treat mild to moderate depression as effectively as an antidepressant.
Exercise is a powerful depression fighter. It promotes all kinds of changes in the brain. It releases endorphins (powerful chemicals in your brain that energize your spirit and makes you feel really good). It can also serve as a distraction, allowing you to find some quiet time to break out of the cycle of negative thoughts that feed depression.

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